The Summit Counseling Center
Contact Us (678) 893-5300

Do You Want “Better” or “Different”?

No Comments
Tis’ the season for… resolutions.

Bad habits, weight loss, career goals, new friends, money, relationship improvement – all are fair game and fodder for the resolution grist mill.  We’ve all made resolutions at one time or another and occasionally achieved some good results from a few of them while most others go by the wayside to repeat on next year’s list.

Resolutions are about “change” (“I want a better result or a better process in my life”) and “commitment” (the motivation to achieve such a change”).  Desires for positive change have common threads.  We want to change in meaningful ways that “improve” our inner experiences – thinking patterns, overall feelings, and better behaviors.  An experience of inner peace and happiness.

A sense of well-being.

Resolutions are seductive and our outcome fantasies seem wonderful, yet we somehow manage not to achieve our desired result.  Come springtime, we are back to our old habits and ways.  Change is hard to implement. Why?

A key answer lies in understanding the contrast between being better and different.

This contrast is what all therapists have to discern with every client who sits on our couches.   It is about true motivation: do I want “better” (meaning “relief”) or do I want “different” (meaning “fundamental change”).

Using the example of an alcoholic: does he/she want relief from alcohol and the unmanageability (consequences) his/her drinking incurs, or does he/she want freedom from alcohol and the peace of mind and stability that sobriety affords. This model is true for resolutions of all types:  quitting smoking, diet and exercise, relationships, and so on.

Why not both “better” AND “different”?  Because these are two separate focuses of motivations.

“Better” is a relief-seeking motivation stemming from accrued consequences (physical issues, relationship woes, cravings, poor self-esteem issues, etc.) while “different” is a fundamental change in lifestyle.  Resolutions based on “better” will, sooner or later, collapse under the weight of old thinking, beliefs, and habits when you start feeling better.  The momentum is lessened and unsustainable.

Resolutions based on “different” will fundamentally change our thinking, beliefs, and habits leading to permanent changes in our lives.  This requires time and hard work in all phases of our lives:  mind, body, and spirit.  “Better,” or relief, happens when become the “difference” you are working toward achieving.

Becoming “different” is freedom.

It really is up to you! So, for your New Year’s resolution, ask yourself: is my core motivation just to be “better” and gain “relief,” or to truly become “different?”

4 Parent Tools for Teenage Depression

No Comments
Nurse Treating Teenage Girl Suffering With Depression

Finding out that your teenager is struggling with depression can feel like you were hit over the head by a ton a bricks. You feel confused, sad, and scared. A lot of parents feel unsure of what to do next or how to be supportive. Though this can feel like an overwhelming obstacle, there are things you can do to help.

1. Listen. Be open to hearing what your teen has to share with you. Validate their feelings. At times depression can make us feel or think in ways that appear irrational. Trying to tell your teen that things will be fine or they need to get over it can actually make them feel ignored and misunderstood instead of comforted. A lot of times our need to try to fix things as quickly as possible is actually based in our own anxiety. Take a deep breathe and try to be patient with your teen (and yourself).

2. Encourage your teen to engage with others. Depression can make teens feel isolated and disconnected. You might notice them withdrawing from friends or other activities they use to enjoy. If you see that happening, suggest other activities they can get involved in.

3. Prioritize health. Depression can cause people to either get too much or not enough sleep. Try to gently encourage regular sleep. In addition, physical activity is a great way to combat depression. Taking teens away from the screens and going outside for a walk can be really impactful. Yoga has been shown to be especially effective for helping teens who are struggling with depression as a way of being more mindful and integrated with their bodies.

4. Find professional help. You don’t have to do this alone! Therapists are licensed to treat depression and research has shown that depression is very treatable with the right treatment. We are all here to help and are passionate about providing support for teens who are struggling.

For more information or to make an appointment with one of our therapists visit our website at summitcounseling.org

Summit Counseling Center Debuts Mental Health Kiosk at the North Fulton County Mental Health Collaborative

No Comments
Categories: News

New initiative to reduce stigma and increase help-seeking in the community

dsc_9120_team_smallJohns Creek, GA. – October 27, 2016Summit Counseling Center in partnership with the Will To Live Foundation, today announced that it unveiled a mental health kiosk in North Fulton county. The kiosk is part of the Summit’s Check-Up from the Neck Up campaign to raise awareness for mood disorders, such as depression and allows individuals to connect with appropriate treatment resources. Individuals are encouraged to take an anonymous online screening at Screening.MentalHealthScreening.org/Summit to check in on their mental health.

Approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experiences mental illness in a given year.  One of the leading deterrents for seeking treatment is stigma. MindKare® Mental Health Kiosks are designed for use in public spaces and aim to reduce stigma by making screening for treatable conditions like depression or anxiety as commonplace as blood pressure screening.

dsc_9106_presentation_small“This initiative aligns with the county’s vision of improving the health and well-being of all residents”, said County Commissioner, Bob Ellis. “The kiosk will help reach people who may not have traditionally sought help for mental health or substance abuse.”

The kiosks are freestanding stations that offer a quick, anonymous way for individuals to check in on their behavioral health by providing users with:

  • Online self-assessments for common mental health disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and substance use
  • Information on whether their assessment is consistent with a common mental or behavioral health disorder
  • An overview of the signs and symptoms of treatable behavioral health disorders
  • Educational information and resources for quality, local treatment options

“We have embraced the concept of anonymous online screenings as a solid behavioral health intervention.  The MindKare® program will help us expand our reach in the community”, said David Smith, Executive Director at the Summit Counseling Center. “Taking a public health approach to behavioral health can help prevent the onset of common mental health disorders, as well as lead people to treatment and community resources earlier on.”

dsc_9123_conversation_smallNot only will the kiosk be available at events sponsored by the Summit Counseling Center, it is also available to be used by other organizations within the community to help raise awareness and remove the stigma surrounding mental health.

Over the past two years, Summit Counseling Center and the Will To Live Foundation have partnered with Fulton County Schools to provide therapists on site at six of the North Fulton County high schools.  This partnership helps remove barriers (stigma, cost and transportation) that would otherwise prevent students from receiving the help they need.  “We are seeing great outcomes from this partnership”, said John Trautwein, Co-founder of the Will To Live Foundation, “and are excited to expand our partnership in the community with this important new initiative.”  Last year, while speaking at Screening for Mental Health’s 25th National Screening Day gala in Boston, Mr. Trautwein met Doug Chamberlain, CEO of Appleton Partners, who was in attendance and was inspired to fund the new MindKare® program in North Fulton county.  “We are grateful to Mr. Chamberlain for this generous donation and the impact that it will have on our community,” said Mr. Trautwein.

MindKare® kiosks utilize an innovative online screening platform developed by Screening for Mental Health, the pioneer in large-scale mental health screenings for the public. The online screenings are not diagnostic but educational in nature. The screenings consist of a series of questions designed to indicate whether symptoms of a mental health disorder are present. After completing the screening, participants receive immediate confidential feedback and referral information to local resources for further information or treatment.  These screenings can be accessed through the kiosk or directly online at Screening.MentalHealthScreening.org/Summit.

About Summit Counseling Center

Summit Counseling Center is a non-profit counseling center located in North Fulton county.  Through partnerships with local schools, churches, civic organizations, and other non-profit organizations, the Summit provides awareness, education, and counseling services…with the vision of “A community that is mentally well and stigma free.” Visit our website at SummitCounseling.org to learn more about the Summit and the services that we provide.

About Will To Live Foundation

Will To Live Foundation is dedicated to preventing teen suicide by improving the lives and the “Will To Live” of teenagers everywhere through education about mental health and encouraging them to recognize the love and hope that exists in each other.  Visit Will-To-Live.org to learn more about the foundation.

About MindKare®

Screening for Mental Health, Inc.

Guaranteed Way to Reduce Stress

No Comments
reduce stressBelieve it or not, stress isn’t caused by a situation itself, but instead it comes from how we think about the situation. For some parents, their child is about to start applying to colleges for the first time. This is an exciting, but also stressful time for most students. The student’s worrisome thoughts include “what if I don’t get into my dream school?”, “what if my resume isn’t good enough” or “should I have taken that extra AP class last semester?” Their minds can be consumed by the “what ifs” instead of dealing with “what is.” One way parents can help their child reduce stress is to model a skill called mindfulness.

In a nut shell, mindfulness is being consciously present in what you’re doing, while you’re doing it, without analyzing it or judging.  In order to manage your mental and emotional state, you simply recognize and acknowledge your emotions and thoughts in each moment-to-moment experience, without judgement. Mindfulness is the opposite of multi-tasking. As life continues to get busier and technology tries to keep you more connected, it may feel counterproductive to slow down and only focus on one thing at a time. However, research shows that practicing mindfulness regularly can actually improve concentration and increase productivity, reduce the symptoms of anxiety, stress and depression, reduce impulsivity, and increase overall happiness. One study even found that students who engaged in a mindfulness meditation before taking an exam actually performed better than students who did not.

Parents: When you notice your child starting to worry about the “what ifs” of getting into college, acknowledge and validate their feelings of worry and doubt. They’ve spent the last 4 years of high school preparing for this, so of course they’re worried about this next step! Then, in a supportive and loving way try to redirect their attention to the “what is” of the situation, meaning what do I actually know for a fact in this very moment? For example, this is a new experience and they don’t know what to expect. What they do know is their GPA and the admission requirements of the school they are applying to. They’re freaking out, and you probably are too! Helping bring their attention back to the present moment will keep their brains from going down the rabbit hole of worry.

Redefining Success

No Comments
Redefining SuccessEach of us innately have a definition of success, which we carry around as an unspoken measuring stick.  We use it to make decisions about ourselves and others regarding performance.  We use it to make decisions about relationships, jobs, family, religious congregations we attend, neighbors, cars, schools… the list is unending.  Each interaction draws our measuring stick out. This measuring stick evolves as we interact with more people and get feedback from our environment.

For most of our life, this is helpful.  It spurs us forward and upward.  It keeps us from giving in to our inner desire to lay on the couch all day and watch Netflix.  It reminds us that we need to get up, get going, keep striving.  And it helps us to evolve, to achieve and to contribute to the world in which we live.  As long as life is bringing events that we have expected and approved of, we can use our inner measuring stick to our benefit.

However, there are times in our life when this inner measuring stick begins to work against us.  When things do not go as we expected, when life hands us things we don’t like, that hurt, that disappoint, that paralyze us, how then do we use this tool?  Unfortunately, during those times, it would be wise to pick up a different tool. It is a different set of circumstances, so a different set of expectations is warranted.  But we don’t do that, do we?  We expect ourselves to have super-human strength, to carry on as though life is not painful or nearly impossible.

Daily, I am asked, “why can’t I function like I used to?” Or “Why can’t I function like they can,” as they compare themselves to others who are not experiencing life as they are. These are the people who have come in for help, for support and for solace from a life that has handed them a set of circumstances and emotional challenges beyond what most of us experience.  They are the brave.  They are the hurting.  Yet, they are not trading in their mental measuring stick for one that is more appropriate for their circumstances.

Mindfulness is a tool that many of us, facing circumstances we never would have asked for, utilize in order to become successful in spite of all that we face.  It allows us to redefine success, to evolve or change our measuring tool.  Instead of asking a global assessment question of functioning, it asks, “for this moment, in my current circumstances, what does success look like.”  Often success becomes much smaller wins.  And often, they carry much more weight than any of the “big” wins we experience outside of unwanted circumstances. Because, in those moments, it takes that much more strength, effort and determination to reach it. It frees us from drudgery, from pushing through.  It gives room and breath and allowance for rest, for emotions, and for small steps.

For those of us found in circumstances that hurt, I encourage you to consider a mindfulness exercise.  Think of a person whom you love and care about.  If that person was in the same circumstances and the same pain or disappointment, what would you expect of them?  Ask yourself what you would say, what you would expect, how you would react to them.  Would you be more kind to them than you are to yourself.  If the answer changes as you think of this person for whom you care, I urge you to allow that to become your new tool.  Allow that exercise to evolve how you speak to yourself, how you care for yourself and how you approach each moment.  Redefine your definition of success.  Write it down and put it up in your home, maybe on your mirror, as a reminder of this new perspective.  And rest in the space this creates in your mind from the chaos you were preciously involved in. You are enough. You are capable.  You can take the next step.

4 Ways to Stay Mindful

No Comments
4 Ways to Stay Mindful - Summit Counseling CenterMindfulness is the practice of fully engaging in and being aware of the present moment, being nonjudgmental, and not clinging to moments including thoughts and emotions. Mindfulness helps lower anxiety, stress, and depression by enhancing an individual’s mind and body connection which improves understanding of emotions and thoughts. Wanting to try mindfulness? Keep reading to get tips on getting started.

1. Re-focus when you’re feeling distracted

Mindfulness can help you reset your focus to work on the task at hand and pay attention to one thing at a time. When you’re focusing on one thing at a time you will be less likely to be lost in thought of focusing on your worries. In our fast paced world, we are so used to multitasking. Try focusing on only one thing at a time. Yes, you heard me! That means putting away your phone when you are having a conversation, watching a TV program, or sending an email!

2. Stay in the present moment

Practicing mindfulness helps you keep your thoughts in the current moment. Try observing your surroundings, describing what’s in your environment, and/or fully participating in an activity of your choice.

3. Let it in and let it go!

Acknowledge the feelings and thoughts you are experiencing that are taking away from the present moment, but don’t cling to them. Allow them to come and go freely. You can imagine that the feelings and thoughts are being washed away by the ocean, floating away down a river, moving by with a cloud, or another image of your choosing. This allows you to have thoughts and feelings without getting stuck or distracted.

4. Practice Non-judgment

When you judge yourself or others you unintentionally create ineffective thoughts and feelings such as feelings of shame or guilt. Instead of labeling experiences as “good” or “bad”, try saying exactly what you mean. What is good to one person may be bad to another. Replace “I did so badly on the test” with “I don’t like my grade on the test” or “I’m awful at relationships” with “I don’t like my behaviors in relationships.” Saying what you mean helps you express yourself, understand yourself, and ultimately identify what you want to change.

If you are having difficulty managing your emotions try incorporating mindfulness into your daily life. You can do this 10 minutes a day by practicing centering prayer, guided imagery, or simply observing your breathing. Mindfulness helps teach us to pause and check in with ourselves in a non-judgmental and accepting way.

Dialectical behavior therapy is a unique treatment that incorporates mindfulness. If you or your loved one are struggling with relationships, regulating emotions, or have difficulty managing distress make an appointment with one of the Summit’s Intensively Trained DBT clinicians – we’re here to help. Make an appointment by calling 678-893-5300 or visiting www.summitcounseling.org!

5 Ways to Avoid a Power Struggle with Children

No Comments
5 Ways to Avoid a Power Struggle with ChildrenThe new school year is almost here and for some families that means children are excited about having a more structured routine, but for other families children can be resistant to the changes that come with going back to school. Adjusting to the new pressures of school can add a lot of stress for children, which may result in more defiance.

We’ve all been there, the climax of a power struggle with a child— we know we’re losing (we’re almost always losing), we wonder how we got there and how we can make this stop. Sometimes it starts small, maybe your six year old refuses to take a bath, an hour has gone by and you’ve threatened they can’t watch TV for a month, no toys for a week, they can’t date till they’re 21, and you swear someone has taken over your body because you just heard yourself say something like “BECAUSE” even though your rational self remembers from public speaking class or English 101 that argument has no legs to stand on. This scene probably ends with both you and your child going to your separate rooms, closing the door, and crying.  To help avoid escalating a situation into a power struggle with your child, here are 5 questions you can use to assess the situation before it spirals out of control.

1. Is your child safe?

As always, first assess, “Is this an issue of safety?” If the answer is anything close to “No, not really,” then let’s move on.

2. Is this arbitrary?

Once I worked for a company that had someone donate tickets to a pro basketball game for us take our middle grades clients that were attending a summer camp group. We got hooked up with a private suite. At one point a few of the boys stood up to watch the game and a couple of the adults with our group kept yelling “sit down” followed by threats that they wouldn’t be able to participate in future events. These 12 year olds were looking around, confused about why they were in trouble. I, too, was confused. I finally had to speak up and tell these adults they were being irrational. Why can’t these 12 year boys stand up at a basketball game of all places? There was no answer; it was just an arbitrary rule. Sometimes we make rules just to have control or because we have a preference on the way something is done but there isn’t actually negative consequence if these “rules” aren’t followed. If your child doesn’t finish all the broccoli on their plate, will they stop growing? Will children in other countries stop being hungry? No.

My favorite parenting technique to teach is natural consequences. Most often the best way to stop a power struggle before it starts and still have a consequence in place is to let the situation play out. It’s 40 degrees out but your child doesn’t want to wear his jacket to school today because he isn’t cold? You could spend 20 minutes of your morning arguing about the jacket, he can be late to school, you can be late to work, or you could let him be really cold for a day and chances are tomorrow he’ll want to take his jacket. There is also a chance he actually isn’t cold without his jacket and maybe his body responds to temperature differently than yours.

3. Is there an alternative?

I once witnessed a child be punished because an adult was eating dinner at the same time a child was banging keys on a piano. The adult asked the child to please stop because the sound was bothering him. This situation played out very theatrically with lots of crying and screaming. From the child’s point of view he wasn’t doing anything “wrong” and he doesn’t understand why his actions were not okay. In this situation I see 3 alternative solutions: the adult could pick up his plate and move somewhere where the sound was less annoying, the adult could have compromised with the child (also great social skills training) that the child take a break from playing on the piano during dinner time and may play again in 15 minutes, or the adult could have given the child an alternative activity to do with his hands that would still be entertaining but less quiet. Sometimes the real problem is we don’t want to take the 2 minutes to work out the problem so we yell and make threats that the behavior stop now, which consequently usually ends up taking more of our time.

4. Can this wait?

For this one I’m thinking of situations in which it is an important lesson for you to teach your child and you so desperately want them to “get it” in the moment, but maybe this should be a conversation for later. This can be situations like your child hits another child and you want them to apologize, but it escalates into something very theatrical and you can’t convince your 4 year old to act like an adult and apologize. Another example is grandma buys your child a very expensive gift and the child will not say thank you nor give grandma a hug. This could be a situation in which the rules aren’t arbitrary. However, in some cases when you are on the brink of a power struggle, it may be best for you to apologize to the person, remove the child from the environment, talk to the child about kindness, respect, personal space, etc. Sometimes even helping the child act out how to make a situation right can be helpful. “Sarah, when you see Charlotte tomorrow, what can you say to let her know you feel really bad about hitting her today?” “John, what can you say to grandma to let her know you appreciate the gift she gave you?”  These are important lessons but maybe the child needs to calm down first and then apologize at a later time. It will probably mean more to the other person when the child is feeling more sincere.

5. Am I reacting to this situation or something else?

As parents you carry a lot of stress. If only your kids could understand that you really need to make this deadline with no distractions because that’s how you keep your job that buys them all the things they need and want. Alas, the human brain doesn’t fully develop until the age of 25 so you’re in for a long ride. The times that can be the easiest to escalate a situation into a power struggle is when you are really stressed and tired. During these times you feel like the easiest thing to do is to bark orders and have your child obey them or else they are grounded from fun for the rest of their lives. Most often what ends up happening here is a power struggle that ends up taking much more of your time and energy than it would to stop and think through your options and come up with a better alterative. Ask yourself am I really that upset their bed isn’t made up or is it all those other stressors that you are unleashing in that moment?

These 5 questions could help you quickly assess if a situation is even a problem, if there is a way to keep things from getting out of control, and could save you from wasting time that could be spent reading an extra bedtime story.  However, there are some factors that when applied to these scenarios are not solved as easily. If you are repeatedly having an issue with power struggles in the home then be sure to follow up with a pediatrician or therapist.

What is “good mental health?”

No Comments

What is Good Mental Health?Good mental health.

As a therapist, I’m often asked by clients, friends, and general questioners about their personal mental health.  These questions come in many forms, mainly along the lines of, “am I crazy for thinking (or doing) this?”  Of course not, in most cases.

However, there are many good reasons for asking this question.  All of us, at times, wonder about our own mental state.  There is a wide range of good mental health, and most of us fall within this range.   In fact, there is a guide book, called the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Psychiatry, Version V (DSM-V), that details abnormal psychology – thoughts, emotional states, and behaviors that fall out of the wide range of normalcy.

So, what is good mental health?

Good mental health is feeling and behaving appropriately to your current situation in life.  It IS NOT about feeling good all the time (this is called addiction).   For example, if you lose someone close to you, then feeling sad and grieving is appropriate and considered good mental health – even though you do not “feel good” at this time.  It is the right set of feelings appropriate to your current situation.

Conversely, someone who is chronically depressed or anxious – without a here-and-now event that invokes these feelings, is not exhibiting good mental health.  It is not to say one is in “poor mental health.”  However, there is a list of criteria and diagnosis in the DSM-V indicating chronic depression or anxiety is a clinical issue requiring treatment (anti-depressants are the number one prescribed medicines).

I recommend checking in with yourself, meaning at some point every day focus inward and conduct a general inventory of how you are feeling and behaving.  If you are not sure, ask another person whom you trust for their observation and opinion.  See if you are generally aligned with mood, thinking, and behaviors with current situations you are facing.

If you have an extraordinary situation you are experiencing (death of loved one, physical trauma or discomfort, loss or change of career or relationship, etc.), expect to be “off of your game.”  Prepare yourself and others you care about that you are not “going to be yourself” for a few days or weeks.  As always, give yourself a break and allow the not-so-comfortable feelings to run their course while you act appropriately.

In other words, exhibit good mental health.

Five ADHD Home Remedies

No Comments
Five ADHD Home RemediesWhether your child has been officially diagnosed with ADHD/ADD or just shows certain ADHD/ADD tendencies, there are certain strategies you can try to get your child through a challenging school year.

Structure and routine

As parents we have to be disciplined and consistent enough ourselves to routinely implement and enforce bedtimes for adequate sleep (8-10 hours), set clothes out the night before, a select few chores to conquer in the morning (make the bed, put dishes away), a select time and place to do homework/study, and an injection of breaks/rewards for completed work/chores.

Video games in moderation

Any child, especially an ADHD/ADD child, will play video games all afternoon, evening, and nightlong if you let him, so set boundaries of no more than an hour of video games during the weekdays, and no more than 2-3 hours a day during the weekends (including Fridays).

Get active

Every child (or adult for that matter) should find time in a day to sweat for at least 15-20 minutes because of the benefits exercise does for the brain, especially the ADHD/ADD brain.  When parents are more active themselves and make it a point to routinely exercise, it increases the chances of their child following suit.

Nutrition and diet

It’s really not necessary to totally revolutionize your fridge or pantry, but it is important increase your child’s daily protein intake (especially with breakfast) and decrease sugars and carbs (again, moderation is key here).  Proteins can be made fun for children too because they include beef jerky, chicken and sausage biscuits, cheese sticks, and even cold pizza (thin crust preferably).

Get involved

It’s key for not only parents to get involved at their child’s school, but find ways to get your child involved too.  This just doesn’t mean clubs and sports, it also means finding ways for your child to help the teachers out during class by helping them run school errands or hand materials out in class, especially the inattentive ADHD child that bores easy.

For more information on how to help your child strive in school and families cope better with ADHD, feel free to call 678-893-5300 to set up an appointment with one of our child and adolescent therapists.

The Secret to Making Friends

No Comments
The Secret to Making Friends - Summit Counseling CenterBeing a teenager can be stressful at times. As a teen, you are working to develop your identity and creating a value system that makes sense to you. The teenage years might be a time where you feel insecure or uncomfortable in your own skin, you might feel like everyone is judging you or you don’t fit in. These thoughts and fears can make creating friendships difficult at times. Don’t worry, you’re definitely not alone. Keep reading to find out tips on approaching new people!

Identity your interests

Take some time exploring the activities you enjoy and the things that are important to you. This may be small group, a sport, a club, online interests, or various other activities. Identifying the things you like and feel passionate about will help you meet people who may share those some interests or it can help you talk about your interests to other people.

Let go of your judgments and assumptions

It can be hard to approach people and start a conversation when we are worried about what the other person might think about us. Try telling yourself that the other person might be as nervous as you are and is unlikely to be judging you. It will also give you a confidence boost to remind yourself of previous positive experiences you’ve had interacting with other people.

Be interested in the other person

Let’s be honest, we all like the opportunity to talk about ourselves. When meeting a new person try shifting your focus to them and ask them questions and act interested in what they’re saying. Try to acknowledge their responses and be light hearted. Doing this will allow the other person to feel interesting and will likely encourage them to ask you questions and learn about you! As friendships continue you can both taking turns participating in each other’s interests through conversations and activities.

Just keep breathing

Doing something your scared of can be intimidating. Try using structured breathing if you start getting nervous. Being mindful of your breaths can help shift your focus to your breathing and conversation instead of your anxiety.

Practice makes perfect it easier

It’s okay to be nervous when you’re trying to make friends. It can seem easier to avoid the opportunity out of fear of failure, but the more you do it, the easier it will become to approach new people. Try reframing the phrase “I can’t do it” to “I am scared.” This will help you practice patience and compassion with yourself. Remember, you don’t have to be perfect for someone to enjoy your company.

onsite_school_based_counselingIf your teenager needs someone to talk to please call the Summit Counseling Center to make an appointment with one of the licensed School-based Therapists located in Alpharetta, Centennial, Chattahoochee, Johns Creek, Milton, and Northview high school at 678-893-5300!

The Summit Counseling Center
Back to Top